Thoughts on: Connected Conferences (or lack thereof)

Reflection, Uncategorized

This post has been in my draft folder for a far too long, and I think it’s about time to sit down and bang it out.

In the last couple of years, I have come to embrace social media as an invaluable tool for my continuing education and participation within the field of ESL (and education in general). I use Twitter every day, although I don’t have a smart phone, so I check it a few times a day instead of getting constant updates. I blog (obviously) about my experiences in the classroom and within my own profession. I subscribe to blogs and websites and read them on an RSS feed daily. These tools have become a part of my daily professional life, and as I venture out into the field and attend in-person professional development opportunities as well, I feel excited to blend the two experiences.

I recently attended the International TESOL Convention and Language Expo in Dallas, as well as a local Minnesota Writing and English Conference in Bloomington, MN. While I wrote about my experiences at these PD events in previous posts, I wanted to write this post about the lack of connectivity via social media present at these events. There were thousands of educators and professionals at the convention in Dallas, and while they had a TV set up in a central area of the convention center, there were probably less than 20 people tweeting about their experiences during the convention. Why was social media present but so under utilized? I understand that many people have yet to embrace Twitter as a legitimate channel for online professional learning, but I was really surprised at the lack of participation and discussion via Twitter at the event.

By the Twitter feed at TESOL.

I have been to a grand total of one international convention and three state-level conferences thus far in my career, and I have noticed a few things about the way social media outlets are utilized by event coordinators and participants:

  1. Participants seem to be situated along a spectrum of social media participation that extends from not connected at all to 100% connected and participating. It seems that conference participants fall at one of those two edges of the spectrum, rarely in the middle.
  2. Not only do larger conferences seem to understand the potential benefits of utilizing social networking sites during such events, but they also use them more effectively.
  3. Different fields have different feelings about using social networking sites for professional development. For example, the first thing a group of web designers discussed while planning a local event was getting a Twitter account up and running. While within the field of ESL (at least in Minnesota), those in charge of events (MinneTESOL) are unconvinced of the benefits (however, there are a few subgroups within the MinneTESOL organization that have embraced Twitter completely).

I guess I’m just unimpressed with the degree to which the field of ESL has embraced this new (sort of) technology. Change takes time, especially in education, I guess.

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One thought on “Thoughts on: Connected Conferences (or lack thereof)

  1. Hello 🙂 I wonder if it simply has something to do with age as well?

    Or perhaps it does have to do with the conference or organization. For example, I’m part of BESIG – which is the Business English Special Interest Group of IATEFL – which is sort of like the European version of TESOL. At the last conference in November 2012 I definetly saw an uptick in Twitter use – in fact, the plenary speech was about “Digital Skills for the 21st Century Workplace”… you can see it at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNJUgCCyLtM&list=PLZmX4NULhNNYM_-DhRYxTE714ikcFVbkZ&index=7

    I totally agree however that it seems as though there are 2 groups – those using it 100% and those staying far away. 🙂

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